When will the United States get its public earthquake early warning system?

The idea behind earthquake early warning dates back to the 1868 earthquake on the Hayward Fault in the San Francisco Bay Area. Below are some key milestones in the path to implementing early warning in the United States.

2019 (Jan): Large scale public test in Los Angeles with the rollout of the ShakeAlertLA app (~800,000 downloads)

2018 (Oct): Pilot projects begin to implement actions to happen manually or automatically in response to a ShakeAlert

2016: Pilot projects start to explore ShakeAlert uses

2015: US Congress provides $8.2 million for earthquake early warning

2014: US Congress provides $5 million to begin construction

2013: California passes legislation to create statewide system

2012: West coast wide testing of ShakeAlert begins

2012: BART automatically slowing trains upon receiving ShakeAlerts

2011: ShakeAlert: Alerts going to test users in California

2011: Moore Foundation awards $6.5 million for early warning

2007: Real-time testing of E-larmS in California begins

2000

1995 Great Hanshu (Kobe) Earthquake

Damage from Kobe earthquake

1990

1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake

Damage from Loma Prieta earthquake

1985: Tom Heaton proposes a "Seismic Computerized Alert Network"

1980

1970

1960

1950

1940

1933 Long Beach Earthquake

Damage from Long Beach earthquake

1930

1923 Great Kanto Earthquake

Damage from Great Kanto earthquake

1920

1910

1900

1890

1880

1870

1868: JD Cooper proposed earthquake warning system for San Francisco